The Tidy Street Interviews



  • 30/03/2013
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    8 Magazine
    Who isn't fascinated by a peek into their neighbour's lives? An exhibition in Tidy Street, in Brighton's North Laine, provides us with a legitimate opportunity to do just that. Working with photographer Lisa Creagh, the residents have chosen
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  • 30/03/2013
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    The Argus, Wednesday October 18th 2006
    The birth of a child, a father feeding a fox, an encounter with the first man in space, the commemoration of a mounteneer's death - these are just a few of the striking images brought together for an exhibition in the North laine
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  • 30/03/2013
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    24 Hour Museum Nov 7th 2006
    Artist Lisa Creagh has turned a street into a tribute to the snapshot with enlarged photographs taken from the residents' personal albums put on display in their front windows. Go to Tidy Street in Brighton's North laine before October 22 to see the pictures.
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  • 30/03/2013
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    BBC News
    Households on a street in Brighton are displaying photos of their family members as part of an art exhibition. The enlarged images, which have been placed across windows in Tidy Street as part of Brighton Photo Fringe, glow The artist said her project generated when lights are switched on "extraordinary stories" after dark. Artist Lisa Creagh, who instigated the project, wanted to tell the stories of the people who live in the houses. "Every home has a different world and hopefully the pictures are an illustration of that," she said.
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Tidy Street, 2006



Tidy Street, in the heart of Brighton’s North Laine, was turned into a large scale public gallery for the duration of the Brighton Photo Fringe October, 2006 in a project with residents.


I collaborated with the residents of the street using snapshots from their personal photo albums to be exhibited in their house windows, each image transformed into a window-sized light box and illuminated from 6 pm to 10 pm for the two weeks of the festival.

Tidy Street has had a long and varied history, reflecting the changes that Brighton city as a whole has experienced. In the 1850’s for example the street was a mix of homes and businesses, including a greengrocer, dressmakers, beer retailers, plumbers and painters and coal merchants. Now the street is home to young and old alike, those that have lived on the street for most of their lives, to those that are new to Brighton, those with young families, students and commuters, has two contemporary lifestyle and fashion boutiques and the Americana café-diner, Rock Ola.

"The street has changed quite a lot since 2006 and I should think the majority of your houses and residents are still here.  Then I think there were just the two babies.  Now there are 16 kids that vary from 2 to 12.   We had a “take your lunch out” a few Sundays ago that culminated in two very large speakers being placed on the street and something of a rave kicking off.  Some of the Kensington Place residents called the police and a very amused van-load of riot police pulled up to find Ruth and Heather amongst others enjoying a good knees up.  In a couple of weekends time we have our annual street camping trip which is a very good laugh.  I think in many ways your exhibition was the thing that first galvanised the street together into the community it is now." - Hugo Butterworth, number 19

The project was covered in local newspapers, television and radio and had a long term positive effect on the community of the street.

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© Lisa Creagh 2017