• 24/04/2016
    Comments (0)
    Making Space at Fabrica Gallery, January 2018
    Holding Time is a multi-screen installation featuring animation, stills and video. Using material created over the past three years of breastfeeding mothers, this one day installation will test a working method of showing stop motion portraits alongside an abstract 'time map' based on Cosmateque designs.
    ...read more
  • 24/04/2016
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    Holding Time at ONCA Gallery, February 2018
    Holding Time is a multi-screen installation featuring animation, stills and video. Using material created over the past three years of breastfeeding mothers, this one day installation will test a working method of showing stop motion portraits alongside an abstract 'time map' based on Cosmateque designs.
    ...read more
  • 24/04/2016
    Comments (0)
    Holding Time at Royal Brompton Hospital, April 2018
    Holding Time is a multi-screen installation featuring animation, stills and video. Using material created over the past three years of breastfeeding mothers.
    ...read more
  • 29/06/2015
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    Holding Time - Funded by ACE, June 2017
    'm delighted to report that my third application (!) to the Arts Council resulted in full funding for Holding Time for 2017/18.
    ...read more
  • 29/06/2015
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    Holding Time - Update
    It has been such a privilege and a pleasure to witness these mothers, each at their own point on their journey of motherhood. Sometimes a mother is photographed once, sometimes more times, depending on the prevailing winds, technical issues, how we are both feeling and whether or not I can remember how to take a picture on that particular day.
    ...read more
  • 29/06/2015
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    The Parlour
    With the launch of Holding Time in September 2017, podcasts will regularly appear on the Parlour site, along with portraits of breastfeeding mothers, written interviews and a blog. The Parlour is an experimental collaboration designed to permanently break the cultural stigma surrounding breastfeeding. Growing out of ideas formed in the inception of my photography project, Holding Time, it is a space for women to comfortably discuss breastfeeding. By combining a broad program of documentation and discussion through web streamed talks, social media and a body of shared images it is a political intervention, both real and virtual.
    ...read more
  • 29/03/2013
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    Art as Medicine
    For anyone who has spent time in hospitals as a patient, visitor or healthcare professional, it is clear that good art enhances not only the immediate environment but also contributes not only to patients mental well-being but also their recovery rates.
    ...read more
  • 29/03/2013
    Comments (1)
    On Time and Ecology
    Lack of Time. No Time. No time to stop. Time and our relationship to it, is central to our possession of ourselves
    ...read more
  • 29/03/2013
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    Bullet Time and Cyclical Time
    While the world reeled from the dizzying implications of this event, a different kind of ‘reeling’ was taking place in editing rooms across the world. The numbered frames were cut, frozen and slowed for re-examination.
    ...read more
  • 29/03/2013
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    Drawing Time: Notes on Time and Photography
    A survey of writing on the subject of Photography and Time
    ...read more
Page 1

Holding Time at Royal Brompton Hospital

Sunday 15th April - Sunday 14th June

Free admission, 24 hours per day, seven days per week
Exhibition Space, Royal Brompton Hospital, Sydney Street, London SW3 6NP


Royal Brompton will be showing Holding Time for two months this spring, with an installation of photographic still portraits, a single screen animation and video recorded interviews with participating mothers. The exhibition will also feature a specially commissioned piece for the hospital, which includes interviews with Sabrina Byrne and doctors and nurses who support mothers with very seriously ill babies through the process of breastfeeding. The finished piece will be on permanent exhibition in the expressing room in Rose Ward after the exhibition.

This exhibition is produced in conjunction with The-Parlour.org and rb&hArts.

rb&hArts


rb&hArts runs an innovative arts programme at Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust. It is designed to improve the clinical environment and patient experience, and enhance the well-being of patients, visitors, staff and the local communities surrounding each hospital. The department manages a permanent collection of 1,200 artworks, delivers bespoke visual arts commissions, and runs an innovative participatory arts programme, comprising music on the wards and workshops. they engage over 5,000 people each year, often participating in the arts for the first time.
Support the rb&hArts programme rb&hArts are supported by a range of trusts, including Royal Brompton & Harefield Hospitals Charity, as well as individual donors. They are always looking for volunteers that can help us fundraise or take part in activities to bring the healing power of the arts to more patients.
Donate to the arts programme

The Parlour


A comprehensive review series on breastfeeding in The Lancet, published on 30 January this year, gave a clear signal of what is needed to be done and pointed at Britain as having “the worst breastfeeding rates in the world”. Even if this is maybe not a fair picture, as rates of starting breastfeeding are relatively high, they do point to a rapid drop-off rate, and most mothers state they stop breastfeeding earlier that they would have wanted to. As others have mentioned, and as this important open letter states, the breastfeeding crisis in the UK is a crisis of lack of support. This crisis comes at a time when the UK is going through a moment of profound cuts to breastfeeding support services. As Dr Nigel Rollins, one of the co-authors of The Lancet reports, puts it clearly: “The success or failure of breastfeeding should not be seen solely as the responsibility of the woman. Her ability to breastfeed is very much shaped by the support and the environment in which she lives. There is a broader responsibility of governments and society to support women through policies and programmes in the community.” The Parlour was founded on the belief that we need to move away for thinking about breastfeeding solely as a women's individual choice, to thinking about it in terms of a collective responsibility. With this aim in mind, the Parlour aims to creating spaces where breastfeeding women can find cultural, social and emotional support, and thus, to plant seeds for cultural change.



 

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© Lisa Creagh 2017